EFP Brief No. 160: Future Jobs and Skills in the EU

The renewed Lisbon strategy stresses the need for Europe to place more emphasis on anticipating skill needs. Globalisation, technological change and demographic developments (including ageing and migration) pose huge challenges in that respect, comprising both risks and opportunities. At the same time, a lack of information on future skill needs has been a long-standing concern in Europe. With specific targets set in the Lisbon strategy, the need for regular forward-looking assessments has gained momentum. Subsequently, this resulted in the recent New Skills for New Jobs initiative by the European Commission, and related European projects aimed at identifying future job and skills needs using quantitative modelling approaches. While having advantages of robustness, stakeholders as well as the European Commission identified a clear need for complementary, more qualitative forward-looking analysis. Consequently, the European Commission (DG EMPL) earlier this year commissioned a series of 17 future-oriented sector studies (Horizon 2020) on innovation, skills and jobs following a qualitative methodology. The final results of these studies will become available in spring 2009, and will be followed by a number of other initiatives over the year to come and beyond.

EFMN Brief No. 160_Future Jobs and Skills

Tags: arts, chemicals, education, globalisation, human resources, jobs, lifelong learning, migration, mobility, safety, SME, SWOT, universities

Categories: brief, Environment (including climate change), EU, Geography, Health, Nanosciences, nanotechnology, materials, new production technologies, Socio-economic sciences and the humanities, Themes, Time Horizon, until 2015, until 2020

Author : Felix Brandes